Kayyem Gaining Momentum in Mass. Governor’s Race as Alternative to the “Next in Line”

Coming off a very impressive debate performance this week, former Obama and Patrick administrations official Juliette Kayyem has the “Big Mo’” going into this weekend’s Massachusetts Democratic convention.

The Shad is a delegate to the convention and is proud to support Kayyem. Massachusetts has a impressive tradition of never rubber stamping a vote for whoever is “next in line” or somehow entitled to the nomination. The favorites, state Attorney General Martha Coakley and state Treasurer Steve Grossman are both highly qualified and experienced. However, they also carry the baggage of past, failed attempts at higher office.

Me and Juliette

Coakley was playing defense in the debate and still evokes the memory of her historic loss in her 2010 US Senate race against Scott Brown to fill the seat of Democratic legend, the late Ted Kennedy. She has struggled to articulate her positions on some important issues including casinos and whether a repeal question can legally appear on the ballot.

Kayyem

Grossman never even got passed the gubernatorial primary in 2002, losing to Shannon O’Brien. In Tuesday’s debate, he was guilty of a political Mortal sin. He was boring. He is favored to win the convention delegate vote but he seems to be heading to a New York Rangers-like conclusion—he is sitting on a lead but is likely to eventually lose it.

Former Medicare and Medicaid chief Don Berwick’s campaign is claiming he has the 15 percent of the delegates to appear on the primary ballot. The Shad questions that. We’ll see.

Health care executive and accomplished surgeon Joe Avallone was impressive when The Shad heard him speak to a small group last month. However, he lacks the name recognition to get to a primary.

Kayyem is positioned to follow Gov. Deval Patrick’s road to success by connecting directly with voters, offering new ideas and new approaches, and solidifying her place in the race as the next generation; the next leader of the Commonwealth.