Looney Dwarfs Romano in Every Possible Respect

There are some things—politically speaking—that The Shad simply can’t stomach. 1) Someone who thinks he is more effective than he really is; 2) Someone who has absolutely no perspective of where he stands; 3) People who try to be clever with other people’s names; 4) Someone who has no respect for people far more experienced and accomplished than himself. Connecticut Republican Party Chairman J.R. Romano scores on each point in his op-ed responding to Senate President Marty Looney’s own column.

First, Romano botched an attempt to be clever with a play on Sen. Looney’s last name. He titled his piece, “The Looney-acy of senate president’s arrogance.” The proper, childish way to put it would be “The Loon-acy.” You’ve got too many syllables there, junior.

Anyone who knows or has worked with Sen. Looney would agree that his name and “arrogance” would never appear in the same sentence (unless he’s calling out a petulant party chairman). Sen. Looney is respected, admired, accessible and good-natured.

Senate President Martin Looney

Senate President Martin Looney

Romano’s column is written as if it is directed at Looney. He shoots himself in the foot by comparing the Republican Party’s effectiveness in state government to “the person who answers the phone at the front desk for the company going under.” Maybe a party so feckless in doing its job should concentrate on winning a few more elections and possibly get promoted to the mail room.

There has been a great deal of political posturing over the state budget situation and very little of it comes from Looney. A little more think-y and a little less talk-y on the part of Republicans would help.

Conn. Republican Party Chairman JR Romano

Conn. Republican Party Chairman JR Romano

Chairman Romano doesn’t belong on the same political planet as Sen. Looney. Looney is thoughtful, and cares about his constituents. Romano is the political equivalent of a Little Leaguer trying to play in the majors–good trash talking, little accomplishment.

In the bigger picture, a political leader’s op-ed about the workings of government should not be met with a personal attack (although the personal attack can be met with another personal attack from a third party as this blog post demonstrates).