NEW Q: CT SUPPORTS THE DEATH PENALTY BUT NOT AS DECIDING FACTOR IN GOV RACE

Sixty-five percent of Connecticut residents support the death penalty but only a small number—6-percent—would cast their vote for governor based on that issue according to the latest Quinnipiac University poll.

Much has been made of the difference between the two candidates for governor on the issue. Republican Tom Foley supports the death penalty (but would not change the current law to expedite the process) and Democrat Dan Malloy is against it (but says he would sign a bill abolishing the death penalty prospectively or going forward and would not affect the Cheshire home invasion defendants should they be sentenced to death).

The poll shows that 65-percent of those surveyed support the death penalty in general, up slightly from previous polls. When asked specifically about Cheshire case Steven Hayes, 76-percent said they support the death penalty. Hayes awaits the penalty phase of his trial, scheduled to begin next week.

The results of the poll may have been predictable since previous surveys have shown strong support for the death penalty. But more telling in the closing weeks of the campaign is that only 6-percent would use the issue as a deciding factor in their vote for governor.